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https://www.stereophile.com/content/vandersteen-2c-loudspeaker-measurements

"I found a touch of lift in the high treble (tweeter set to +1dB) to be necessary to counteract the speaker's slight lack of off-axis air; this has to be balanced, however, against exaggerating the excess of HF energy above 10kHz. Though this might then be thought to leave the midrange a little depressed, I nevertheless found -1dB on the midrange control to give the optimal balance between the need for sufficient high-midrange energy and not to unduly emphasize the speaker's uneven response in the same region. This will be different for every listening environment and system, however. "

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16 hours ago, olds1959special said:

https://www.stereophile.com/content/vandersteen-2c-loudspeaker-measurements

"I found a touch of lift in the high treble (tweeter set to +1dB) to be necessary to counteract the speaker's slight lack of off-axis air; this has to be balanced, however, against exaggerating the excess of HF energy above 10kHz. Though this might then be thought to leave the midrange a little depressed, I nevertheless found -1dB on the midrange control to give the optimal balance between the need for sufficient high-midrange energy and not to unduly emphasize the speaker's uneven response in the same region. This will be different for every listening environment and system, however. "

Stereophile's measurements are not accurate because John is fair to everyone and puts the microphone on the tweeter axis.  The only problem is this is not where the Vandersteen alignment wants the listeners ears!  John himself has written several times that his measurements are not like the measurement I send him (when reviewing our upper end products which have actual measurements included with the speaker) but they would match if he measured them where his ears are after I set them up.  None of our speakers are designed to be listened to on tweeter axis.  RV

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Great stuff Richard.  Thanks.  I've just never been an EQ guy, other than in my cars.  I had a really special set up in my first car (new Mazda 626 with upgraded 15" black rims).  I was a newly minted Navy Ensign and stationed in San Dog (I drove the USS Kitty Hawk or Sh!tty K!tty for short).  I went to a high end mobile audio store just a few doors down from Stereo Unlimited (Bruce's place).  I had all Zapco amps and EQ.  We cut for all separate speakers and a sub in the trunk, which was rare in 83.  The system cost over 4k and the car was purchased a few months prior for 10,250 total.  It was my Ensign mobile and we partied on the beach with it constantly.  

Some of these threads bring back memories.  

For the home system, I was given an EQ for my system before I went to college, but I took it out as I didn't like what it did to the music.  I used one at times when I was a DJ, but even then, I just cranked it up for everyone to get their groove on.  For home it was my CJ PV?, Roberson and or Harvey's Moscode amp modified and Polk 10 Monitors with the Polk speaker cables on stands.  TT was a Sota I also got from Bruce.  Wish I still had it.  That's the first time I met Richard as he and Bruce were in the back room setting up the 2's.  I was mesmorized by the sound.  

 

Back to the EQ talk.  🙂.  

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Regarding the aforementioned contour control adjustment on my 2Ci's, I previously found a benefit from turning up the tweeter by 1dB or so. But I never thought to also decrease the midrange by the same amount.

It seems to almost create something like a U-shape similar to the frequency response of some speakers and headphones, creating more of an emphasis on bass and highs with less midrange. I feel these speakers are bass heavy by nature, so adding the tweeter boost helps, with the accompanying midrange reduction for overall balance and clarity.

That's just my experience though. I really like what this adjustment does for my 2Ci's.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Decades past, receivers/integrated amps, those crap sounding SS buzz boxes. I had one, a Pioneer SA-9500. That thing  benefited from a Soundcraftsman EQ ( made in California ) or a Vector Research EQ, ( early China stuff ). Had an MXR 1/3-octave passive EQ in my Pro audio days. Said EQs provided both the ability to affect tone and introduce more SS AC line buzz into the stereo. These days, EQ is largely handled through equipment choice, tube rolling, or, environment.

Cody

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Right now I'm testing a different dac which is very unlike my previous one, (lean, bright vs warm and fuzzy) and I found setting the contour controls on the speakers to flat helped tame the sound. I am happier knowing the speakers response is not altered if that's possible.

Edited by olds1959special
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