Jump to content

Art not Music


Tomstruck

Recommended Posts

          Did you ever buy a album just for the cover art not knowing the artist or music and being surprised that you like the music 

I purchased this album back when it was first released and I was in high school  just because I thought it looked COOL had no clue who he was or type of music 

did not care it was about the cover turns out I liked the music too  its synthesizer music  I have  even bought  more of his albums

So my question to everyone did you ever do the same and what album was it IMG_4947.thumb.jpg.b2b3a027b5a9017c5e9ceacfc90202b1.jpg

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have never purchased off the cover, but I have loved many covers.  As a kid, Sticky Fingers (Stones) was one of my favorites.  If I recall, I think the zipper was real.  I had a special recording from Japan.  I have my albums just sitting in a box in the closet now. I should go look to see what's there.  I really need to sell them. Not sure of the worth etc...

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I kinda kick myself for literally dumping my LP's years ago.

I didn't have anything worth money, but, there were some that haven't been digitized, so I had to buy them again in order to have them converted to digital.

To be honest, there were just a few that need to be digitized.

B

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 4/10/2024 at 2:59 AM, Tomstruck said:

          Did you ever buy a album just for the cover art not knowing the artist or music and being surprised that you like the music 

 Got this for my eldest as I liked the cover.
She said, “Keep it, it is to “pop” sounding for me”…
I actually rather like the whole album, at least something like all but 1 or 2 of the songs on it.

 

IMG_1737.jpeg

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...
Posted (edited)

I can't say I've ever bought an album without knowing more about the music or artists. I always wanted to make sure I only bought stuff that I believed was, or would be, important to me. Part of that was my dad (successfully) hammering it into me to be careful with my money.  That being said, yes I was certainly influenced by artwork. There is so much going on in this one, I very well could have bought it knowing little about the music. But it is in fact the second album from Bow Wow Wow, the band being an offshoot of Adam and the Ants (most of the Ants were scavenged from Adam) and were a creation of Malcom McClaren (previous project being The Sex Pistols) The vocalist being a new discovery by McClaren,  then 15 year old Burmese-British Annabella Lwin (a deep sigh from 20 year old me).

 

And as a contrast I include the original artwork that this was taken from: Manet's Le Dejeuner sur l'herbe.

bow+wow+wow.jpg

Manet’s painting Le Déjeuner sur l’herbe.jpeg

Edited by JollyRovingTar
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 5/8/2024 at 7:29 AM, JollyRovingTar said:

I can't say I've ever bought an album without knowing more about the music or artists. I always wanted to make sure I only bought stuff that I believed was, or would be, important to me. Part of that was my dad (successfully) hammering it into me to be careful with my money.  That being said, yes I was certainly influenced by artwork. There is so much going on in this one, I very well could have bought it knowing little about the music. But it is in fact the second album from Bow Wow Wow, the band being an offshoot of Adam and the Ants (most of the Ants were scavenged from Adam) and were a creation of Malcom McClaren (previous project being The Sex Pistols) The vocalist being a new discovery by McClaren,  then 15 year old Burmese-British Annabella Lwin (a deep sigh from 20 year old me).

 

And as a contrast I include the original artwork that this was taken from: Manet's Le Dejeuner sur l'herbe.

bow+wow+wow.jpg

Manet’s painting Le Déjeuner sur l’herbe.jpeg

Awesome post.
I saw Bow Wow Wow once in SoCal.
Can’t say I am as well versed in the other arts though.
But I certainly find it interesting… Thank you Sir!.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

JollyRovingTar  Welcome to the form

 The art work is great I forgot what its called when recreate art live  the same thing was done in M*A*S*H with the last supper by daVinci

Post some photos of your system 

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks all for the welcome. Myself, I have been pretty content in my audio situation for the past 20+ years. I got to a point I really liked, let the magazine subscriptions lapse, and tried not to let my self be bothered about whatever new stuff was coming out. Just enjoyed exploring the music. It was a good life. 

Then I made the mistake of going to  Axpona 2024 (the last HiFi show I went to was a Stereophile show in Chicago - was that the 90s?). I really wasn't looking for anything in particular, just wanted to hear what there was to hear and see what it was all about. Based on earlier experiences, the Vandersteen room was on my must visit list. I finally got there on Sunday. I heard a few rooms prior to that that were memorable and remarkable, But when I heard the Vandersteen room, there was something inherently right - and real - that I was now hearing. And while my other best-of's were still pretty darn good, but I now knew this was my destination.

I keep kicking around the idea of writing up an introduction here - maybe next week, I have a big local music fest going on this weekend. But I have a hundred thoughts ratting around upstairs, and I'm afraid my intro may turn into a ten page manifesto. You may yet regret this early encouragement.

Be well my friends.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 hours ago, GdnrBob said:

Tableau Vivant, I believe

So you got me curious and I looked it up. The definition could fit, but the way I read it, it didn't have to be recreating any other art, but was an artwork unto itself. It's even suggested that it could have been medieval porn. Haha. A great call, nonetheless, I was not familiar with this term. Also interesting that todays living statue performers could be considered our modern tableau vivant.

"A tableau vivant (French: [tablo vivɑ̃]; often shortened to tableau; plural: tableaux vivants), French for 'living picture', is a static scene containing one or more actors or models. They are stationary and silent, usually in costume, carefully posed, with props and/or scenery, and may be theatrically lit. It thus combines aspects of theatre and the visual arts.

They were a popular medieval form which revived considerably from the 19th century, probably as they were very suitable for recording by photography. The participants were now mostly amateurs, participating in a quick and easy form of amateur dramatics that could be brought together in an evening, and required little skill in acting or speaking. They were also popular for various sorts of community events and parades.

In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, there was also a type of tableau used in the professional theatre, taking advantage of the extra latitude the law[citation needed] allowed for the display of nudity so long as the actors did not move. Tableaux featured poses plastiques ('flexible poses') by virtually nude models, providing a form of erotic entertainment, both on stage and in print. Tableaux continue to the present day in the form of living statues, street performers who busk by posing in costume. In film or live theatre the performers sometimes briefly freeze in position for a tableau vivant effect."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...