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Hearing Aids?


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I just had my hearing checked today, and it seems I am near the point of needing hearing aids.- Loss of upper frequencies.

Does anyone here listen to music with hearing aids?

Are they unobtrusive to listening enjoyment?

These are probably dumb questions, but I had to ask. 

Bob

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No dumb questions here Bob!  I’m in a similar situation.  Had a test some years back. Same diagnosis; loss of high frequencies.  Had it done a few months ago, with the intent of getting hearing aids. One thing to consider, most (if not all) “over the counter” aids are just mini amplifiers.  I’m not an auditory expert, but my understanding is custom made aids also filter out background noise, i.e. in restaurants, which is a significant element of hearing impediment.  

I was thoroughly tested at a Costco hearing center, big dip in the high frequencies.  The tech tuned a pair to my results and had my wife & me go walk around the store.  When we returned, he asked me if it helped. When I told him there was very little improvement, he said “I didn’t think you were a good candidate for hearing aids.”

I’m not providing very helpful info, but I’m under the impression, if you spend big $ (like in the 5K to 8K range), they can be effective.  Not sure about the impact on listening to music.  
 

I feel like Michael Fremer - “I don’t hear as good as I did in my 30’s, but I’m a much better listener.”

Play on

 

 

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Hi GdnrBob,  be carefull because all hearing aids do is some filtering (good) but bombard your ears with more energy (bad).  Go as long as you can without them and even then use them only when necessary.  Our ears lose hearing because of age, exposure to loud sounds and sometime some other medical causes.  Loudness limits used to be at the point of discomfort or pain but we now know it happens at anything near continuious at less than 85dB!  I am 71 and can still hear 15K but I have always used ear protection especially in the race car, airplane, boat and here at work.  I have gone to very few rock concerts because the sound level has always been uncorfortable for me even with custom ear protection.  If you protect them this demise can be slowed down dramaticlly and you will be able to listen and enjoy a great hi-fi for many more years.  The changes in your hearing are self compensating as long as a great recording of a piano still sounds like a piano did yesterday at the Club.  If you try to find a speaker that makes a piano recording sound like they did when you were young......well I don't know of a speaker with enough tweeters for that to happen and it would be tough to keep any paint on the walls.

RV

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Thanks for the quick replies.

@Steve Edwards, I was going to check out Costco myself.

My ETN and audiologist both said I am right at the cusp of need hearing aids. For the most part, I can hear most things without issue. Only when I try to hear a conversation  in a noisy room or a really soft voice, does it become noticeable.

I can enjoy my stereo systems at the moment, but was wondering how adding a hearing aid would affect my perception of sound.

But, it seems Mr. V.  has a good idea of what I will be doing to my hearing, if I do get a pair.

To be honest, I was wondering if being able to compensate for my loss of high frequencies would make listening to music more engaging.

B

 

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Live unamplified music is the gold standard regardless of the condition of ones ears.  Boosting the highs will reduce enjoyment because the sub harmonics will be all out of kilter at frequencies your ears hear well.  All of us especially men have the handycap of wanting to be impressed when evaluating but once we mature the emotional engagment drives it away and music rules.  There is a reason all of the TV's have everything turned MAX at COSTCO  or Best Buy.  You made your choise and were sutably impressed,  bought your system so turn that part OFF and enjoy the music.

RV

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@Richard Vandersteen,  Well put.

One thing I find amazing is that I really don't 'notice' the fact that my high frequencies are rolled off. I know this a part of the brain 'equalizing'/compensating, but I am impressed nonetheless that our brain/nervous system can do such things.

Perhaps this is why audio is so personal? But, as we are all fans/owners of Vandersteen, we all must share some common trait?

This is a Puzzlement!-Though it might be The Balvenie and playing Schumann's 2nd symphony.🥴

 

B

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  • 3 months later...

@Stringreen,

I have never tried them, yet. 

But, considering how digital sound is evolving, perhaps 'more natural' sound will evolve.

It would be interesting if those involved with sound reproduction, like Mr. V, could offer their expertise to these manufacturers.

-Seems like there would be not only money to be made, but a boon to those with diminished hearing.

B

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