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VLR mounting


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I have the VLR's in my office mounted on some cheap Amazon speaker brackets on the walls.

They support the speakers fine, but I am wondering if they are allowing them to move/vibrate. Hence, I am considering using some more professional speaker mounts, as the ones I am using only allow the speaker to rest on a ledge.

These mounts would require my attaching them directly to the cabinets. For security, I would be using T-Nuts. 

Considering how the floor standing Vandies benefit from a solid decoupling from the floor, I thought my VLR's would benefit from being suspended in much the same way.

Question 1- Can I remove the speaker driver to access the interior of the VLR?

Question 2- Do you (looking at Mr. V.) think this will be an improvement over what I am using now?

Thanks in Advance.

Bob

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I would play music at a normal volume and touch the VLR with your finger tips.  If you feel much movement that you don't feel on the wall nearby it may be good to use a more rigid bracket of some kind.  If the wall feels about like the speaker going more rigid could make it worse.  This is a very different situation than with the floor standers because the Mid/Woofer in the VLR has much less moving mass therefore much less kinetic energy.  The panels of the VLR are constrained layer damped like many Vandersteen's so one would not want to compress the inner and outer layers because it would defeat the system.

RV

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@Richard Vandersteen, @Holmz,

Thanks for the replies.

I was unaware of the damped panels, so thanks for the 'heads up'!

The screw in nuts look very nice. I haven't seen them before (but I haven't seen a lot of things). I would seem they would provide the security of holding the speaker, minus the effect of compressing the layered panels.

Bob

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A Forstner bit or a plunge router can be handy for those.
In a house, I suppose that  a lag bolt also works… But I like the idea of metric, or freedom unit, machine thread. 

The T nuts are a total pain (PitA) with anything that they do not bite into, and if they are not stuck in, then they drop out.  I avoid them at any reasonable cost.

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20 hours ago, Holmz said:

The T nuts are a total pain (PitA) with anything that they do not bite into, and if they are not stuck in, then they drop out.  I avoid them at any reasonable cost.

I would agree, but I was going to insert them through the inside of the speaker so that the bolt would be pulling it into the panel. Using your screw in nuts would probably eliminate the need to open up the speaker. Especially so, if I use a drill stop to keep it from going in too far.

I wonder if there is any damping material inside the VLR's?

B

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I am not sure I even know what a VLR is, nor how it is mounted.

In a some sealed up box I would be the threaded inserts, But if it is easy to get into the box then a T-nut is fine. And one can also put some epoxy on it to keep the b’stard from leaping out of its place when the screws are out… or maybe silicon sealer. It is the blind side installs where they can give angst and vexations. 

If a VLR is like a VSM, then I probably need to start paying attention.

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19 hours ago, Holmz said:

If a VLR is like a VSM, then I probably need to start paying attention.

Haha!

The VLR is a bookshelf speaker. The VLR is the skinny one that hangs on the wall. I have a pair sitting around that I was going to use for Home Theater, but never got around to it. -If you can use a pair let me know. I'll give them away for the price of shipping.

I used T-Nuts on a pair of Zu Omen Bookshelf speakers before I got the VLR's. And, when installing them on the inside (after removing the driver, of course), epoxying them in, and then using screws from the outside, the T-Nuts held quite nicely.

Had I known about your threaded nuts, I probably would have used them instead.

Bob

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Let Tomic give them a whirl.
I am still intrigued by Purifi drivers and having an active system with some class-D amps. And happenstance I found a local speaker builder that I believe I am seeing late next week.

I offered to set up the daugheters with some basic stereo system, but no bites there. And teh Mrs is using a blue tooth cube in her craft room. So bookshelf spoeakers are not even on the cards.

But the VLRs would likely be cheaper and easier than going the full active route. And I would need to figure out how to dispose of the PrimaLuna amp if the flu active is sounding good,.. So part of me just doesn’t even want to try looking down the rabbit hole.

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On 11/2/2021 at 2:10 PM, GdnrBob said:

I would agree, but I was going to insert them through the inside of the speaker so that the bolt would be pulling it into the panel. Using your screw in nuts would probably eliminate the need to open up the speaker. Especially so, if I use a drill stop to keep it from going in too far.

I wonder if there is any damping material inside the VLR's?

B

Yes, there is damping material inside the VLR.

RV

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  • 1 month later...

Instead of opening the speaker i would drill a hole and put a metal wall anchor in there with a lock nut on the outside of the cabinet. With the lock nut you can set your bolt depth. Then on the wall i would mount a key hole bracket and slide the head of the bolt into it locking it in the wall. The nut will leave a slight gap behind the back of the speaker so that the cabinet can resonate freely. 

Edited by Paul S.
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Thanks for the replies.

I did touch to the cabinets as Mr. V. suggested, and found little movement if any. So, they are probably okay.

I have a more professional mount that would require bolting directly to the speaker. The only reason I would want to use it is that it allows for greater ability to adjust positions.

Like I said on another thread, I am quite content with my current setup, but sometimes I want to see if I can put different icing on the cake.

 

Bob

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From memory, it is just a metal plate that hooks into the metal plate on the back of the speaker. I bet you could either make one  with a  little imagination, or put in a pair of well anchored screws that extend out the proper distance.-Though they would have to be perfectly level.

B

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7 hours ago, GdnrBob said:

From memory, it is just a metal plate that hooks into the metal plate on the back of the speaker. I bet you could either make one  with a  little imagination, or put in a pair of well anchored screws that extend out the proper distance.-Though they would have to be perfectly level.

B

I’ll dig out the steel or alloy, when I am back at it.
(It has to be pretty apparent.)

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