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LED lighting & amplifiers


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I recently had my SS mono amps recapped.  While picking them up, I was discussing capacitors & their longevity with the owner of the shop.  In addition to recommending  shutting down the amps once a month for 24 hours (I usually leave them powered on 24/7) so that they could "cycle", he asked me if I had any LED lights near the amplifiers.  He indicated that they can cause damage or shorten the life of the capacitors.  That's the first time I've heard that; has anyone else?  I do have a small lamp on the floor (with an LED bulb) behind each plant, sitting next to each speaker.  

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LED's do cause noise and is well known.  Ripple and heat are what damages electrolytic caps.  Turning a component on and off is the ultimate  max ripple which caps are designed to handle but there is no evidence to support this practice as an advantage.  It is recommended to bring the voltage up slowly if they have been off for years.  Film caps do form and change sonics over time but last almost forever.  Most electronic devices last longer if they are left on except for tubes or LED's.

RV  

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Guys, I can honestly say that my system would pick up noise from the LED lights in my room.  This was a big reason I installed 2 totally isolated circuits that are both individually grounded outside with copper rods.  It made a large difference in sound. 

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Thank all of you for the feedback.  No Jim, they’re the two-pin type that just insert into the socket.  I’m not ready to run independent circuits yet, but I will ditch the LED’s.  Is a halogen a better choice than an incandescent?  Also, for ambiance, I have both those lamps on a dimmer.  Might that also be a source of noise?

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yes almost all dimmers dump noise back into circuit. A dedicated line might be pretty affordable option. Put it on opposite leg of panel than heat pump, refrigerator, motors…. IF possible.

i also try to get anything with a switch mode power supply on a separate power conditioner

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I concur with @TomicTime.

Adding a dedicated line is usually pretty simple- especially if the wires are accessible. My main system is on the first floor and the basement under it allows for easy access. It also allows me to run my interconnects under the floor to my monoblocks that reside a few feet from my Treo's.

And, if you do add a dedicated line, then have the electrician install a whole house surge protector- If you don't have one already.

It adds another layer of protection for all your equipment.

Bob

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Guys, I had the main lines installed when they built the place, so it didn't cost any extra.  I recently had them run the two circuits to an opposing wall as my system is set up on a different wall then when I first installed it.  It cost me only $500 for them to come in and cut the baseboard/drywall as needed and installed a box (all outlets are the AQ Edisons) behind each speaker and then another box behind the rack.  The second circuit is on another box behind the rack and is used for the router (need the direct hook up behind my server), the LPS I use for router, along with the Apple TV box and other boxes used (used to be Xfinity before I started to stream).  it has darkened the noise floor in a BIG way.  The Niagara also does a fair amount of heavy lifting, but even when I ran without a special conditioner etc, it was outstanding.  I was quoted 1k to do a retro install in a house we are looking at.

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On 8/7/2021 at 1:16 PM, MNSki said:

Steve, was he referring to screw-in LED bulbs that you use  to light a room being detrimental to sound quality?

He didn't specify the type of base and actually, he didn't mention a detriment to sound quality.  His assertion was that LED's can shorten the life of the caps.

All this makes me wonder what is used in all the audio shows.  There is certainly no dedicated outlets in hotel rooms.  Do dealers use incandescent or halogen bulbs?  My understanding is that halogen throws a brighter, whiter glow, while an  incandescent is a little warmer, which would be my preference.  

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Steve, great point!  This is why one should never come to any absolute conclusion at any show.  Example;  I get better sound out of a Quatro CT in my home than I have at shows with the Model SEVEN!  Hotel room,  high ambient noise background, mediocre power, impossible to bring appropriate sound treatment unless the room is familiar and only a day or so to sort the system out.  We often use equipment based on trying to lower cost by  sharing rooms (always a good choice obviously  but sometimes not the best choice for you) because the show are costly and there is no hope to see enough people to be justified.   How many of you  have your system tweaked in one or two days.  The only hope of getting any conclusive evaluation at a show would be to bring your own music and sit in the sweat spot on  Sunday morning when few are present and the room is yours (quiet).  They are fun and it is possible to sort out the lesser products but most of them do not have dealers so this may be your only exposure.  One of the most important ingredients for great sound is "Signal to Noise" this is why we use isolation for turntables, power conditioning and constrained layer damping in our speakers but the ambient noise of the room is often forgotten.  Most residential parts or our cities have similar power day or night but our systems always sound better at night!  This is not power related but if we check the Radio Shack SPL meter (you should all own one by now) our signal to noise is 10db or more improved.  This is a big deal as it lowers traditional distortion numbers by a factor of four.  For many the best next investment may be new windows for the sound room.    

RV  

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many of the dedicated rooms I visit in are sterile, over treated and often look like a bizarre Mariott lobby. I vasty prefer natural materials, rugs, complex shape to the room, real furnishings. i especially loathe 8’ of boxes on the floor in a maze leading to the turntable….

new windows and door coming along w 20 db mini-split AC

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Jim, I totally agree with you on using natural materials in the room at reflection points etc.... I'm so open (loft and open hallways into bedrooms), so I don't have standing bass waves issues.  The bass is dialed in nicely.  I do have a couple of windows in difficult locations, so they got 'treated' with honeycomb shades and I have a couple of quilts to put up on the side walls where first reflection will be.  I also use a screen that is folded like an accordion on the back wall and it has worked ok.  Plants in between the speakers and on the sides of the TV (that has to be in the middle of the speakers) also have worked well.  

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Pete - sounds like you are on the right track ! This photo is of the condo room. The RT 60 is a .65, with the recording studio control room standard being .62. I plan to get there with a whisker of absorption behind the listening chair this coming fall.

No fancy treatments….yet. Steve Edwards also has a very natural, lived in but sonically excellent room for his Quattro.

Best  to all.

 

Jim

5182E584-B79B-4F7D-AFA2-BDD5644CF1E1.jpeg

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